Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 27

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. My schedule is kind of erratic this summer, but I'll try to post at least once a week. :-)

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HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Pentheus, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Semper pertinax (English: Always persevering).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Dura usu molliora (English: Hard things become softer with use)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Omnis est rex in domo sua (English: Each man is king in his own home). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mus non ingrediens antrum, cucurbitam ferebat (English: The mouse couldn't get into its hole because it was carrying a pumpkin; from Adagia 3.3.79).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Non Vivo ut Edam. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Spes alit et fallit.
Hope feeds and misleads.

Longae regum manus.
Long are the hands of kings.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mors et Senex, in which Death catches a man unawares (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vitis et Hircus, which features a talking vine, with English versions here from my summer Aesop project.


Words from Mythology. For more about the Greek character Mentor and modern mentoring, see this blog post.


Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Don't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Three Daughters of Cecrops, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Datum serva (English: Preserve what is given to you).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Probi delicta cum tegas, leges teras (English: When you conceal the crimes of a good man, you erode the rule of law).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Aegypti nuptiae (English: The wedding of Aegyptus; from Adagia 3.1.3... This refers to any tragic and unlucky event, like the sad wedding when King Aegyptus married off his fifty sons to the fifty daughters of his brother, Danaus, whereupon all the sons but one were murdered by their brides).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Non semper erit aestas: It will not alweyes be sommer, take tyme when tyme cometh, for occasion will not alwey serve, when the iron ys whote we must strike, least hit be colde agayne.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Funde Abunde. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Suum cuique pulchrum.
To each his own is beautiful.

Tranquillo quilibet gubernator.
When it's calm, everyone is a helmsman.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Membra et Venter, a fable about the body politic (this fable has a vocabulary list). Plus you can see English versions now too at my summer English Aesop project.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Agnus et Lupus, Bibentes, a famous fable of injustice, with English versions here (a dozen versions so far!).


Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Lucian's True Tale by Alfred J. Church.



Saturday, June 17, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 17

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Sword of Damocles, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Rosa petit caelum (English: The rose seeks the sky).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Nubilo serena succedunt (English: Fair skies follow the cloudy sky).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: In pratis ut flos, sic cadit omnis honos (English: Like a flower in the meadows, so perishes every honor).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Beati mites quoniam ipsi possidebunt terram (Matt. 5:4). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Cura Nulla. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Aut Caesar, aut nihil.
Either a Caesar. or nothing.

Sol efficit ut omnia floreant.
The sun makes all things flourish.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Accipiter Columbam Insequens , in which the hawk experiences karma (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Oves Timidae et Pastor, in which the shepherd tries to rouse the courage of his flock.

Pastor et Grex

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἀποκτενῶ σε καὶ ἀφελῶ τὴν κεφαλήν σου ἀπὸ σοῦ. Percutiam te, et auferam caput tuum a te. I will smite thee, and take thing head from thee.