Sunday, August 20, 2017

Special SOL Edition

In honor of the eclipse tomorrow, I thought I would offer some items about the sun, SOL There are some proverbs, plus a poem:

Post nubila Phoebus.
After the clouds, sunshine.



Aeternum sub sole nihil.
Nothing under the sun is eternal.



Sol efficit ut omnia floreant.
The sun makes all things flourish.




Sol omnia videt et revelat.
The sun sees and reveals all.




More about the poem:


Just as the spring rose grows (veluti rosa verna virescit) at the sight of the sun (solis ad adspectum), so I will flourish (sic ego florebo), with God looking upon me (prospiciente Deo).


Sunday, August 13, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 13

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Idus Augustae, the Ides of August.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Cadmus and the Dragon, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Beati pacifici (English: Blessed are the peace-makers).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Iniuriarum remedium est oblivio (English: The remedy for injuries you've suffered is to forget about them).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Bocchyris iudicium (English: The judgment of Bocchyris; from Adagia 2.7.65 ... A man had a sexual dream about a prostitute, and the prostitute demanded he pay her for dream services; King Bocchyris of Egypt ruled that the money be put into a basin and shaken around so that the prostitute could enjoy the look of the coin and thus be satisfied appropriately).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Currus bovem trahit: Ye set the cart before the horse. This Proverbe hath place in thinges done preposteriously, cleane contrarilye, and arsy versy as they say. As for exemple, if a wife would rule her husbande, if the scolar woulde teache his maister, if the commons would tel theyr Prince what he had to do, finallie if the affection or sensualite would guide reason, as alake for pitie in these cases, and in many other more, it is oft seene.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Spes Una. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Nolite fieri servi hominum.
Become not slaves of men.

Parentes cole, atque eorum voluntati pare.
Cherish your parents, and be obedient to their will.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Vulpes et Uva, the famous story of the sour grapes, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:

Monday, August 7, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 7

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I was out of town last week for one final summer excursion... now it's time to hunker down and get ready for classes!

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum Idus Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Pasiphae and the Minotaur, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Sapiens dominabitur astris (English: A wise person will master the stars).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Stet fortuna domus (English: May this house be prosperous).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Mortis linque metus, si tu vis vivere laetus (English: Put aside any fears of death, if you want to live happily).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Usque ad mortem certa pro iustitia (Sirach 4:28). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Spes Proxima. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Claude os, aperi oculos.
Close your mouth; open your eyes.

Tu dormis et tempus ambulat.
You are sleeping and time walks on.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Mus et Leo, a fable of gratitude, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:

And here is Latin LOLBaby (Enzo) with a fun blog post: Ubi libertas, ibi patria.



Saturday, July 29, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 29

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Kalendas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and Alcestis, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Paulatim, sed firmiter (English: Slowly but surely).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Scit multa vulpes, magnum echinus unicum (English: The fox knows many things; the hedgehog knows one big thing).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Argento obediunt omnia (English: All things obey the coin).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Καιρὸς ψυχὴ πράγματος (English: The right moment is the soul of the deed).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Ditat Servata Fides. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Omnes filii Dei estis.
You are all children of God.

Nemo sine crimine vivit.
No one lives without crime.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Ranae et Iuppiter, in which the frogs ask for a king, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:



Monday, July 24, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Head of Orpheus, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Iuncti valemus (English: Joined together, we are strong).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Post acerba prudentior (English: After bitter experiences, more wise)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is In pratis ut flos, sic perit omnis honos (English: As a flower in the fields, thus public esteem passes away). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Citius elephantum sub ala celes (English: You'd more quickly hide an elephant under your arm; from Adagia 2.5.56).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Ne Sis Ventosus. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Surgite; lumen adest.
Get up: it's light.

Scienter utor.
I wield it wisely.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Ciconia et Vulpecula, a story of turn-about is fairy play, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 18

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Medea and Her Children, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Proteo mutabilior (English: More changing than Proteus).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Pereundi scire tempus assidue est mori (English: To know the time of your demise is to be dying all the time).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Semper Leontini iuxta pocula (English: The Leontines are always drinking; from Adagia 1.3.22... When Phalaris defeated the Leontines in Sicily, he subdued them by taking away their weapons and urging them to drink and enjoy themselves).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Faber compedes quas fecit ipse gestet: The fetters that the smith hath made, let him were them him selfe. The Proverbe whiche commonly we use in english, for this purpose is this: such ale as he hath brued let him drinke him self. Verely manie there be, which make a rod for theyr owne arse.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Non Cito Credendum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Oculi vasa luminis.
The eyes are containers of light.

Virtutis radix amor.
Love is the root of virtue.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Rana et Bos, a fable about a self-important frog, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 11

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Idus Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Judgment of Paris, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Res crescunt concordia (English: With harmony, things prosper ... and on discordia see below).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Vivorum oportet meminisse (English: We should remember the living).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Ex rebus minimis surgit discordia grandis (English: From the smallest things can spring a huge quarrel).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Ne glorieris in crastinum (Proverbs 27:1). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Fide Parum, Multum Vide. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Labore et scientia.
By means of effort and knowledge.

Multa docet fames.
Hunger teaches many things.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Vulpes Sine Cauda, a story about fox fashions, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:

Friday, July 7, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 7

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

I'm really immersed in this English Aesop project, and here at the Bestiaria I'll be sharing some of the animated gifs I'm making with the illustrations I've found for the fables; you'll see the first of those at the bottom of today's post, and you can find out more about that summer project at my Aesop's Books blog.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Nonae Iuliae, the Nones of July!

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Eurydice and the Snake, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Post nubila sol (English: After clouds, the sun).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Pelle sub agnina latitat mens saepe lupina (English: Beneath the lamb's skin often lurks a wolfish mind; and for more on the contrast between wolves and lambs, see the fable below).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Beatum est potius dare quam recipere (English: It is more blessed to give than to take).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἐυτυχία πολύφιλος (English: Fortune has many friends).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Exiguo Vivitur. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Magna vis pecuniae.
Great is the power of money.

Ut ameris, amabilis esto.
To be loved, be lovable.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Agnus et Lupus, Bibentes, a fable of injustice, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Special Edition: July 4

For today's special edition of the Bestiaria  in honor of the Fourth of July, I decided to select some Latin sayings about liberty, along with some cats who know the value of being free, not slaves.


Libertas optima rerum.
Freedom is the best thing.



Sine iustitia nulla libertas.
Without justice there is no freedom.



Fac sapias et liber eris.
Get wise and you will be free.



In libertate labor.
In freedom, there is work.



Nemo nisi sapiens liber est.
No one, unless he is wise, is free.



Vigilia pretium libertatis.
Vigilance is the price of freedom.



Nemo liber est qui corpori servit.
No one is free who is a slave to the body.



O nomen dulce libertatis!
O sweet name of liberty!



Ubi libertas, ibi patria.
Where I am free, there is my homeland.



Quam dulcis libertas!
How sweet freedom is!



In libris libertas.
In books there is freedom.



Nolite fieri servi hominum.
Become not servants of men.